CaringKind Blog


Unfortunately, there is no definitive, scientifically-proven way to reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s and other causes of dementia. Scientists are working to identify risk factors, and ways of modifying those elements. Age, genetics, and lifestyle all may play a part. There is growing evidence that a combination of interventions, i.e., aerobic exercise, weight training, optimal sleep pat [...]

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Other Dementias
What is dementia? Dementia is the loss of cognitive functioning—thinking, remembering, and reasoning—and behavioral abilities to such an extent that it interferes with a person’s daily life and activities. Dementia ranges in severity from the mildest stage, when it is just beginning to affect a person’s functioning, to the most severe stage, when the person must depend completely on others for bas [...]

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Alzheimer's Disease: Treatment
How is Alzheimer's disease treated? Alzheimer's disease is complex, and it is unlikely that any one drug or other intervention can successfully treat it. Current approaches focus on helping people maintain mental function, manage behavioral symptoms, and slow or delay the symptoms of disease. What drugs are currently available to treat Alzheimer's? Several medications are approved by the U.S. Food [...]

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Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnosis
What should I do if I'm worried about memory loss or possible Alzheimer's? If you are concerned about changes in memory and thinking or changes in senses, behavior, mood, or movement that do not seem normal in yourself or a family member (see Symptoms for more information), talk with a doctor. A doctor can administer a brief memory screening test that can help detect problems, and can also do a co [...]

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Alzheimer's Disease: Symptoms
The course of Alzheimer's disease is not the same in every person, but symptoms seem to develop over the same general stages. In most people with Alzheimer's, symptoms first appear in their mid-60s. Scientists know that Alzheimer’s progresses on a spectrum with three stages—an early, preclinical stage with no symptoms; a middle stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (NIH/ADEAR); and a final stag [...]

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